Urgent Lung Transplantation in Severe Acute Respiratory Failure Based on Rapidly Progressive Interstitial Lung Disease A Case Report /

Lung transplantation (LUTX) became a worldwide accepted standard therapy for certain well-defined chronic end-stage lung diseases. Until recently, patients on mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support techniques were hardly eligible for LUTX because of the inferior short-term results. Ho...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Madurka Ildikó Eszter
Elek J.
Schonauer N.
Bartok T.
Kormosoi-Toth K.
Zöllei Éva
Ghimessy Áron
Lang György
Klepetko W.
Rényi-Vámos Ferenc István
Format: Article
Published: 2017
Series:TRANSPLANTATION PROCEEDINGS 49 No. 7
Subjects:
doi:10.1016/j.transproceed.2017.06.020

mtmt:3289831
Online Access:http://publicatio.bibl.u-szeged.hu/27466
Description
Summary:Lung transplantation (LUTX) became a worldwide accepted standard therapy for certain well-defined chronic end-stage lung diseases. Until recently, patients on mechanical ventilation or extracorporeal life support techniques were hardly eligible for LUTX because of the inferior short-term results. However, a paradigm shift has occurred, and now these techniques represent bridging options to LUTX for listed patients. In the current practice, transplantation from the intensive care unit (ICU) is not extraordinary in patients on the waiting list. On the other hand, transplantation of an ICU patient who has previously been healthy without any chronic lung disease is still exceptional. Here we report a unique case of a 37-year-old woman without any relevant medical history who developed acute lung failure based on a cryptogenic organizing pneumonia. Her condition rapidly deteriorated and she required mechanical support, then she was bridged to transplantation on venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation. She was listed for LUTX, and despite elevated panel-reactive antibody values, positive crossmatch LUTX was performed. Induction therapy, alemtuzumab, plasmapheresis, and intravenous immunoglobulin were administered. Her recovery was slow but finally she could be discharged from hospital in stable condition. After 2 months at home, she was readmitted to the hospital with respiratory failure from combined antibody-mediated rejection and infection. Before December 2015, the launch of Hungarian National Lung Transplantation Program, Hungarian patients were transplanted in Vienna. This case presents an exceptional example of national and international teamwork that aimed to save a young woman's life.
Physical Description:1544-1548
ISSN:0041-1345