Decreased pH in the aging brain and Alzheimer's disease

Using publicly available data sets, we compared pH in the human brain and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of postmortem control and Alzheimer's disease cases. We further investigated the effects of long-term acidosis in vivo in the APP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. We finally exami...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Decker Yann
Németh Eszter
Schomburg Robert
Chemla Axel
Fülöp Lívia
Menger Michael D.
Liu Yang
Fassbender Klaus
Format: Article
Published: 2021
Series:NEUROBIOLOGY OF AGING: AGE-RELATED PHENOMENA NEURODEGENERATION AND NEUROPATHOLOGY 101
Subjects:
doi:10.1016/j.neurobiolaging.2020.12.007

mtmt:32024380
Online Access:http://publicatio.bibl.u-szeged.hu/25787
Description
Summary:Using publicly available data sets, we compared pH in the human brain and the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of postmortem control and Alzheimer's disease cases. We further investigated the effects of long-term acidosis in vivo in the APP-PS1 mouse model of Alzheimer's disease. We finally examined in vitro whether low pH exposure could modulate the release of proinflammatory cytokines and the uptake of amyloid beta by microglia. In the human brain, pH decreased with aging. Similarly, we observed a reduction of pH in the brain of C57BL/6 mice with age. In addition, independent database analyses revealed that postmortem brain and CSF pH is further reduced in Alzheimer's disease cases compared with controls. Moreover, in vivo experiments showed that low pH CSF infusion increased amyloid beta plaque load in APP-PS1 mice. We further observed that mild acidosis reduced the amyloid beta 42-induced release of tumor necrosis factor-alpha by microglia and their capacity to uptake this peptide. Brain acidosis is associated with aging and might affect pathophysiol. processes such as amyloid beta aggregation or inflammation in Alzheimer's disease.
Physical Description:40-49
ISSN:0197-4580