The characteristics and prognostic role of acute abdominal on-admission pain in acute pancreatitis A prospective cohort analysis of 1432 cases /

Introduction Pain is the most common symptom in acute pancreatitis (AP) and is among the diagnostic criteria. Therefore, we aimed to characterize acute abdominal pain in AP. Methods The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group prospectively collected multicentre clinical data on 1435 adult AP patients betwe...

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Main Authors: Földi Mária
Gede Noémi
Kiss Szabolcs
Vincze Áron
Bajor Judit
Szabó Imre
Szepes Zoltán
Vitális Zsuzsanna
Varjú Péter
Faluhelyi Nándor
Miseta Attila János
Nagy Tamás
Márton Zsolt
Vereczkei András
Hegyi Péter Jenő
Párniczky Andrea
Hegyi Péter
Szentesi Andrea Ildikó
Format: Article
Published: 2022
Series:EUROPEAN JOURNAL OF PAIN 26 No. 3
Subjects:
doi:10.1002/ejp.1885

mtmt:32508523
Online Access:http://publicatio.bibl.u-szeged.hu/23858
Description
Summary:Introduction Pain is the most common symptom in acute pancreatitis (AP) and is among the diagnostic criteria. Therefore, we aimed to characterize acute abdominal pain in AP. Methods The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group prospectively collected multicentre clinical data on 1435 adult AP patients between 2012 and 2017. Pain was characterized by its intensity (mild or intense), duration prior to admission (hours), localization (nine regions of the abdomen) and type (sharp, dull or cramping). Results 97.3% of patients (n = 1394) had pain on admission. Of the initial population with acute abdominal pain, 727 patients answered questions about pain intensity, 1148 about pain type, 1134 about pain localization and 1202 about pain duration. Pain was mostly intense (70%, n = 511/727), characterized by cramping (61%, n = 705/1148), mostly starting less than 24 h prior to admission (56.7%, n = 682/1202). Interestingly, 50.9% of the patients (n = 577/1134) had atypical pain, which means pain other than epigastric or belt-like upper abdominal pain. We observed a higher proportion of peripancreatic fluid collection (19.5% vs. 11.0%; p = 0.009) and oedematous pancreas (8.4% vs. 3.1%; p = 0.016) with intense pain. Sharp pain was associated with AP severity (OR = 2.481 95% CI: 1.550-3.969) and increased mortality (OR = 2.263, 95% CI: 1.199-4.059) compared to other types. Longstanding pain (>72 h) on admission was not associated with outcomes. Pain characteristics showed little association with the patient's baseline characteristics. Conclusion A comprehensive patient interview should include questions about pain characteristics, including pain type. Patients with sharp and intense pain might need special monitoring and tailored pain management. Significance Acute abdominal pain is the leading presenting symptom in acute pancreatitis; however, we currently lack specific guidelines for pain assessment and management. In our cohort analysis, intense and sharp pain on admission was associated with higher odds for severe AP and several systemic and local complications. Therefore, a comprehensive patient interview should include questions about pain characteristics and patients with intense and sharp pain might need closer monitoring.
Physical Description:610-623
ISSN:1090-3801