Job demands versus resources workplace factors related to teacher's burnout /

Job burnout seems to be a serious problem nowadays, especially among teachers, who experience role conflicts, work load and emotionally burdening situations. The symptoms, like decreased work efficiency, low level of motivation, negative emotions, physical problems and the tendency to avoid soc...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Jagodics Balázs
Szabó Éva
Format: Article
Published: 2014
Series:PRACTICE AND THEORY IN SYSTEMS OF EDUCATION 9 No. 4
mtmt:2871341
Online Access:http://publicatio.bibl.u-szeged.hu/17043
Description
Summary:Job burnout seems to be a serious problem nowadays, especially among teachers, who experience role conflicts, work load and emotionally burdening situations. The symptoms, like decreased work efficiency, low level of motivation, negative emotions, physical problems and the tendency to avoid social relationships are influencing high number of employees worldwide. Certain professionals, for example, medical staff and teachers are more affected by burnout. These occupations seem to strain employees both mentally and emotionally. Empirical evidence claims that certain job demands are likely to provoke burnout, while resources at workplace can help employees to avoid the harmful effects of mental and emotional load. Our online survey investigated burnout among public education teachers (N=327), and examined its relationship with specific workplace factors. The goal of our study was to set up a model which can explain the occurrence of burnout with organizational and workplace aspects. We found significant positive correlation between job demands - like emotional strain and peer conflicts - and burnout factors. On the other hand, job resources - like the support of a superior and the possibility of personal improvement - were related negatively to burnout score. We also found that both emotional and professional social support of co-workers seem to correlate negatively with burnout. These results suggest that certain workplace factors are important in the development of burnout, while others seem to be useful to reduce the effects of job demands. The results also indicate that the social environment at the workplace could have significant impacts on burnout. Support of peers and superiors can be used as resource to solve everyday tasks, to maintain motivation and to aid professional development. In our paper we discussed our results focusing on burnout prevention in schools.
Physical Description:377-390
ISSN:1788-2583