A mouse model of anxiety molecularly characterized by altered protein networks in the brain proteome

Recently, several attempts have been made to describe changes related to certain anxiety states in the proteome of experimental animal models. However, these studies are restricted by limitations regarding the number and correct identification of separated proteins. Moreover, the application of a sy...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Authors: Szegő Éva Mónika
Janáky Tamás
Szabó Zoltán
Csorba Attila
Kompagne Hajnalka
Müller Géza
Lévay György István
Simor Attila
Juhász Gábor Dénes
Kékesi Adrienna Katalin
Format: Article
Published: 2010
Series:EUROPEAN NEUROPSYCHOPHARMACOLOGY 20 No. 2
doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2009.11.003

mtmt:1339155
Online Access:http://publicatio.bibl.u-szeged.hu/16366
Description
Summary:Recently, several attempts have been made to describe changes related to certain anxiety states in the proteome of experimental animal models. However, these studies are restricted by limitations regarding the number and correct identification of separated proteins. Moreover, the application of a systems biology approach to discover the molecular mechanisms of anxiety requires genetically homogenous inbred animal models. Therefore, we developed a novel mouse model of anxiety using a combination of crossbreeding (inbred for 35 generations) and behavioral selection. We found significant changes in 82 proteins in the total brain proteome compared to the control proteome. Thirty-four of these proteins had been previously identified in other anxiety, depression or repeated psychosocial stress studies. The identified proteins are associated with different cellular functions, including synaptic transmission, metabolism, proteolysis, protein biosynthesis and folding, cytoskeletal proteins, brain development and neurogenesis, oxidative stress, signal transduction. Our proteomics data suggest that alterations in serotonin receptor-associated proteins, in the carbohydrate metabolism, in the cellular redox system and in synaptic docking are all involved in anxiety.
Physical Description:96-111
ISSN:0924-977X