Chronic pancreatitis multicentre prospective data collection and analysis by the Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group /

INTRODUCTION: Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life. AIMS AND METHODS: Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database represent...

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Main Authors: Szücs Ákos
Marjai Tamás
Szentesi Andrea
Borbásné Farkas Kornélia
Párniczky Andrea
Kui Balázs
Takács Tamás
Czakó László
Szepes Zoltán
Németh Balázs Csaba
Vincze Áron
Pár Gabriella
Szabó Imre
Sarlós Patrícia
Illés Anita
Gódi Szilárd
Farkas Gyula
Leindler László
Papp Róbert
Hegyi Péter
Format: Article
Published: Public Library of Science (PLoS) 2017
Series:PLOS ONE 12 No. 2
doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0171420

mtmt:3187289
Online Access:http://publicatio.bibl.u-szeged.hu/11772
Description
Summary:INTRODUCTION: Chronic pancreatitis is an inflammatory disease associated with structural and functional damage to the pancreas, causing pain, maldigestion and weight loss and thus worsening the quality of life. AIMS AND METHODS: Our aim was to find correlations from a multicentre database representing the epidemiological traits, diagnosis and treatment of the disease in Hungary. The Hungarian Pancreatic Study Group collected data prospectively from 2012 to 2014 on patients suffering from chronic pancreatitis. Statistical analysis was performed on different questions. RESULTS: Data on 229 patients (74% male and 26% female) were uploaded from 14 centres. Daily alcohol consumption was present in the aetiology of 56% of the patients. 66% of the patients were previously treated for acute exacerbation. One third of the patients had had previous endoscopic or surgical interventions. Pain was present in 69% of the cases, endocrine insufficiency in 33%, diarrhoea in 13% and weight loss in 39%. Diagnosis was confirmed with US (80%), CT scan (52%), MRI-MRCP (6%), ERCP (39%), and EUS (7,4%). A functional test was carried out in 5% of the patients. In 31% of the cases, an endoscopic intervention was performed with the need for re-intervention in 5%. Further elective surgical intervention was necessitated in 44% of endoscopies. 20% of the registered patients were primarily treated with surgery. The biliary complication rate for surgery was significantly smaller (2%) than endoscopy (27%); however, pancreatic complications were higher in the patients treated with surgery. Patients who smoked regularly needed significantly more surgical intervention following endoscopy (66.7% vs. 26.9%, p = 0.002) than non-smokers, and the ratio of surgical intervention alone was also significantly higher (27.3% vs. 10.8%, p = 0.004). The ratio of surgery in patients who smoked and drank was significantly higher (30.09% vs. 12.5%, p = 0.012) than in abstinent and non-smoking patients, similarly to the need for further surgical intervention after endoscopic treatment (71.43% vs. 27.78%, p = 0.004). CONCLUSIONS: According to the data analysed, the epidemiological data and the aetiological factors in our cohort differ little from European trends. The study highlighted the overuse of ERCP as a diagnostic modality and the low ratio of use of endoscopic ultrasonography. The results proved that alcohol consumption and smoking represent risk factors for the increased need for surgical intervention. Chronic pancreatitis should be treated by multidisciplinary consensus grounded in evidence-based medicine.
Physical Description:Terjedelem: 19 p-Azonosító: e0171420
ISSN:1932-6203