Mad Housewives and Cool Girls Gillian Flynn's Novels as Feminist Metafiction /

The aim of this thesis is to interpret Gillian Flynn’s two novels, Sharp Objects (2006) and Gone Girl (2012) as feminist metafictional narratives. The novels belong to the genre of crime fiction, but they also provide a self-reflective critique on ideologically engendered writerly modes and cultural...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Szarvas Réka
Other Authors: Kérchy Anna
Format: Thesis
Published: 2018
Subjects:
Online Access:http://diploma.bibl.u-szeged.hu/74068
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Summary:The aim of this thesis is to interpret Gillian Flynn’s two novels, Sharp Objects (2006) and Gone Girl (2012) as feminist metafictional narratives. The novels belong to the genre of crime fiction, but they also provide a self-reflective critique on ideologically engendered writerly modes and cultural scripts associated with women The first half of the paper offers a summary of the theoretical background to the analysis: an overview on metafiction and the feminist metafiction that serve as a contextual framework for the succeeding close reading and textual analysis. The second half of the paper examines the novels from the perspective of the traditional formats and subversive recyclings of life writing, body studies, female madness and subjectivity.