Reginatus az Anjou-korban Piast (Lokietek) Erzsébet királyné konszenzuális birtokpolitikája és iurisdictioja : 1342-1353 /

It is well known that Queen Elisabeth, widow of King Charles I Angevin, after death of her royal husband (1342), had kept her influence in the administration and government of medieval Hungarian Kingdom. Some scholar and historian states that Elisabeth was a kind of co-ruler of her son, King Louis I...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Diószegi Szabó Pál
Format: Article
Published: 2021
Series:Acta Universitatis Szegediensis : forum : acta juridica et politica 11 No. 4
Kulcsszavak:Jogtörténet - magyar - 14. sz.
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/77762
Description
Summary:It is well known that Queen Elisabeth, widow of King Charles I Angevin, after death of her royal husband (1342), had kept her influence in the administration and government of medieval Hungarian Kingdom. Some scholar and historian states that Elisabeth was a kind of co-ruler of her son, King Louis I (1342–1382). Nowadays, this role needs to revaluate by new editions of contemporary Hungarian charters. My study analyzes the estate policy and jurisdiction of Queen Elisabeth between 1342 – 1353. The first marriage of King Louis I was brief, because his wife Margaret of Luxemburg had died in 1349. Until 1353, the next marriage of Louis, Elisabeth participated the royal estate-donations, which is indicated by recurring formula of donation charters (’de beneplacita voluntate serenissime domine… Elisabeth regina Hungarie nostre genitricis charissime et de consilio prelatorum et baronum’). Notwithstanding, all of this was not originated from her extended power but the authority of royal wives from the period of Hungarian dynasty of Árpads. On the other hand, this estate policy always depended on the authority of her son, King Louis I and his royal authorization. Duke Stephen, younger brother of King Louis I, was also participated in some cases in it, too. I call it consensual estate policy. Probably, it was from the medieval decision making of the family tradition of Angevins. In the second part of my study, I analyze the jurisdiction of the widow queen. She sat in judgement on diversified cases in her court by herself or by her court justice. Particularly, she protected the privileges of royal towns, dominions, villages and their citizens and serfs. In some cases she made writ to Hungarian chief-justies or hold her judicial privilege and used own royal seal. These judgements sketches the main contour of own personal jurisdiction (praesentia reginalis).
Physical Description:45-72
ISSN:2063-2525