Angol-amerikaiak Texasban, 1821-1845

The paper analyses the transitional period of I821-1845, during which Texas broke away from the newly independent Mexico (1836) and in the end was annexed to the United States of America (1845). The focus of research has been on the Anglo-American immigrants and the construction of their identity. B...

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Bibliographic Details
Main Author: Kökény Andrea
Format: Book part
Published: JATEPress Szeged 2008
Series:Bölcsészműhely
Bölcsészműhely, 2007
Kulcsszavak:Texas története, Bevándorlás - USA, Amerikai Egyesült Államok története - 19. sz.
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Online Access:http://acta.bibl.u-szeged.hu/75719
Description
Summary:The paper analyses the transitional period of I821-1845, during which Texas broke away from the newly independent Mexico (1836) and in the end was annexed to the United States of America (1845). The focus of research has been on the Anglo-American immigrants and the construction of their identity. By examining primary sources — travel accounts, diaries, memoirs, and newspapers — I came to the following conclusions. A fair number of Anglo-American immigrants to Texas were victims of economic depression and left their country in the aftennath of the Panics of 1819 and 183 7. When the young Republic of Mexico introduced a generous land policy, Anglo-American emigrants took the opportunity and left their mother-country. When Antonio López de Santa Anna led a centralist turn that endangered the prospects of self-government and economic prosperity for Texas, Anglo-Americans revolted against him. After declaring their independence from Mexico, they drafted a constitution and the same day they applied for statehood in the United States. It was only when the US rejected them, that they found themselves in need of self-definition along new terms. They were not Mexicans any more, but they could not be Americans either. They were Anglo-Americans living in Texas, and tried to describe and define themselves as a group with a separate national identity. They called themselves "Texians." However, they never wholly forgot about their native land. They were in a special situation. Unlike most new nations, they had an alternative to independence: joining the United States.
Physical Description:81-92